On “Not Blogging for an Audience” and The Fear of Failure.


Opinionated Man:

I think we all have a little fear of failure, but we can’t let that stop us chasing our dreams. Nice post and thanks for the pingback and mention! -OM
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Originally posted on Kindle & Paperbacks:

I have writers block. Not right now per se, but I get it often. I get it because I have a fear of failure. I’m a perfectionist although I’m working on it thank you very much. The fear of failure is something we all experience to a certain degree, in our work, hobbies, everyday life. We always get scared of screwing up at some point; and it’s okay. We need to be reminded we aren’t machines, we aren’t programmed to always succeed and we are not to be replaced when we make a mistake because we haven’t fulfilled our purpose. We are human. We fail. We succeed. We do it all over again. It’s part of the circle of life.

Now there are people who want to/ try to distance themselves from the possibility of failing, which I completely understand. It’s not necessarily the best way to deal with an…

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“I don’t blog for an Audience”


I get tired of hearing this sentence from bloggers. If you aren’t interested in gathering a following or having others read your work GOOD FOR YOU! Why is it you feel that it is necessary to parade that ideology on every post you can find that talks about “building a blog or an audience?” How many articles have you read on how to successfully build a blog and how many of those articles have you seen at least one commenter that feels the need to clarify that they “write for themselves?” Good for you… now how about you go write in that corner over there since you are so proud of the fact that you don’t care if anyone else sees your post!

Many of us here on WordPress are writers and we ARE seeking critiques of our work or eyes on our articles. There is nothing wrong with that at all. Don’t get discouraged or put off by people that loudly trumpet in your face that “they aren’t after the numbers or the views.” If you want to focus on that and then in turn feel proud of the fact that you have accomplished a “goal” then do so! Be as proud as you feel like! Simply ignore the “noise” around you that will try and tell you that your outlook is wrong. They are your goals, your outlooks, and it is your blog. Screw everyone else.

-OM

Get over it


I get so amused when I read debates or social media “arguments” in which a person demands another person “post a public apology.” That shit tickles me to death. I have had three people try to demand I post a public apology on this blog since I created it last year. All three people got a large “fuck you and fuck off.”

Humans are so sensitive these days and they get butt hurt over the smallest things. Before you “demand” someone remove something from their blog ask yourself this one question. What right do you have to make such a demand? Is the post about you directly? Why does it bother you so much?

I get why people engage with trolls. I have and do, but I also get something from it. I get amusement and my readers get entertainment because nothing is ever missed on this website. I will never demand someone write an apology to me on their blog because that is just weak. A demanded apology? Really? When I was a child my mother would demand I apologize to my sister or brother. Guess how much I meant them? So why would I ever want to accept a halfhearted, half assed attempt at mollifying my feelings?

If you write it own it. Even if the world comes crashing down upon you, own your views and don’t allow others to intimidate you into changing your opinions. They will try, they have tried on me and they will try on others, but always remember that the person that demands that others share similar opinion to themselves is not looking for “friends.” They are looking for a congregation to preach too and we aren’t sheep are we?

One last thing. I feel the need to say that I don’t care how many “followers” you have on your social media platforms. I don’t care if you have 200,000 twitter followers or even 1 million blog subscribers. That isn’t going to make me bend over and kiss your ass. If anything attempting to intimidate me will only gain you my attention. You really don’t want my attention in a negative way.

-OM

Self-Made “A Daily Gamble”


Most of us, at least those reading this post, are self-made bloggers. Meaning that our work is backed by our own sweat, tears, blood, and motivation. We are not corporate bloggers, we have no advisors or backers, and daily we decide on our own what to put out on the internet. It is a gamble and just because you are “self-made” or “self-published” doesn’t mean you have any less to lose. Recently I read some forum comments attacking Christina Grimmie, a contestant on The Voice, because she is a self-made Youtube.com artist. Suddenly her hard work, her countless hours of self-motivated labor were considered “cheap” in the eyes of ignorant critics who think she has an unfair advantage. Why are these critics ignorant? They, like so many others, do not understand the work that people like Christina put into their profession.

When do you get to call yourself a professional? Is there a dollar mark, hours spent doing something, or some other standard that is set before a person can consider their “passion or hobby” their profession? Just because I work 40 hours a week at a day job, does that mean I can never obtain the title of “professional writer” myself? Is the benchmark of such an occupation these days only publication of some sort? There are other factors people don’t consider that I do. Factors that people like Christina Grimme and all the other talented artists and writers I see and read each day know. We gamble with what we can lose and we can lose our audience any minute. That is a sad truth that those of us that love social media realize. Everyone is a hair breath away from going viral AND being forgotten.

The people bashing Christina on The Voice are morons because they don’t understand the courage it took for her to even go on the show in the first place. Before entering as a contestant she had over 2 million Youtube.com subscribers. That is a very good following on any platform, I can only dream of such numbers. She put that ALL on the line when she decided to go on TV and even if that “following” helped her voting numbers it still could have gone very badly for her had the judges said she “could not sing.” When you leave the comfort of your platform and more importantly the safety of your own channels and websites, you open yourself to criticism you may or may not have heard before. Published authors that go on to create a blog generally already have a “readership” and the feedback they receive is usually expected. It is a much different scenario for a person that began their profession by first gathering an interested audience, rather than putting something of “note” out first.

What is the price of fame and what is it worth? I suppose for every peak of accomplishment for one, that peak simply presents another level for a different person. Some of us want it all and we see an unconquered land in social media. We put all our chips on the table because each day we are playing till we bust. That is the struggle and gamble of a self-made artist, writer, singer, actor, or anyone that represents themselves solely. Consider this before you assume someone has leverage in anything. Often they are putting much more on the line than you are aware.

-OM